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How to use the WP_Query function in WordPress

How To Use The WP_Query Function

Knowing how to use the wp_query function can truly take your development skills to the next level. The purpose of the wp_query function is to extend/customize the WordPress loop, giving you very specific queries and producing some very powerful functionality in your websites. It is definitely a more complex piece of code and requires a lot of precise pieces of information but once you learn the basics it is easy to get the hang of using it.

Learn how to write wordpress if statements

How To Write WordPress If Statements

Knowing how to write WordPress if statements can help you take your websites to the next level. They are meant to pose a question and based on the answer to that question you can do or show something. This can be a really powerful tool in your development work belt, especially with the conditional tags WordPress already has built into the core. In this tutorial, I am going to give you the basics of WordPress if statements and provide a few real world examples.

Add masonry in WordPress

Implement Masonry in WordPress

Would you like to know how to use Masonry in WordPress? This article will show you the basics of getting it set up in your development project. The best thing about using Masonry in WordPress is that it is actually built into the core of WordPress. So we don’t actually have to do very much work to get it working. Good thinking WordPress!

WordPress Custom Taxonomies

Custom Taxonomies In WordPress

Custom taxonomies in WordPress can help you extend the standard ‘Categories’ and ‘Tags’ in your posts. They can also help extend WordPress custom post types if you have created one. Sometimes we run into situations where ‘Categories’ and ‘Tags’ just aren’t enough. Maybe we want to separate things out a little further. That’s what we are going to learn today.

What if you had a project where you were going to apply ‘Categories’ and ‘Tags’ to their posts but also something that would function similarly but called…oh I don’t know…Post Status. Let’s say these posts are being written by many people’s contributions and they need to show that a post is in the creative writing phase or in the proof reading stage. You would be able to harness custom taxonomies in WordPress to accomplish this. Once it has been created, it will show up underneath your ‘Categories’ and ‘Tags’ in the dashboard post menu.

Maybe we need another example. What if your client was a architect. They want to be able to write a blog post about drawing the floor plans and set a category of ‘Drawing Phase’. Then when they begin building the structure, they want to come back into that same blog post and write about the building process. So they would then change the category from ‘Drawing Phase’ over to ‘Building Phase’. Or if they had the taxonomy set as a tag then each phase could be added on as they go. This would require a custom taxonomy called ‘Phase’.

At the end of the article I will explain how to create custom taxonomies in WordPress for the standard post type. For now I will tell you about how to do it with a custom post type because that is where I worked with them in my recent project.

The Problem

In my last article I wrote about creating custom post types in WordPress. I recommend you read that article before reading anymore. In that article I mentioned a client who needed a separate post type to display animals that were up for adoption. They had a few custom taxonomies they needed such as ‘Cat Breeds’, ‘Dog Breeds’, an overall ‘Pet Category’, and a ‘Pet Status’ such as Adopted or In-Active.

Create Custom Post Types in WordPress

WordPress Custom Post Types

This article will teach you how to implement WordPress custom post types. Knowing how to code WordPress custom post types from scratch opens the door to vast possibilities, not only for you as the developer but for your clients as well. WordPress has always been a powerful tool, but with this knowledge you can turn a basic blog website into a massive, multilayer powerhouse.

The Problem

I recently had a client come to us with a WordPress website that used it’s blog as a way to add and display animals that were up for adoption. They then add another WordPress site set up on a separate domain that had blog articles on it. When you clicked to read their blog, you would basically leave the main website and travel to another website. My goal in our redesign and restructuring would be to merge the two together. With WordPress custom post types I was able to do just that.

My vision was to have your regular ‘Posts’ link on the dashboard menu, then below it have a ‘Pet Posts’ link that would harness the same power the posts have but be completely separate from each other. Plus I wanted custom taxonomies instead of using the standard ‘Categories’ and ‘Tags’. This would allow our client to add blog posts and add pets on their main site and not have to log into a completely different dashboard to enter their blogs.

Parallax for WordPress developers

Use Parallax in WordPress

Have you ever wondered how to use Parallax in WordPress? I am going to give you the skinny on how to implement Parallax into any of your future theme developments. After searching all over the internet, I never found a single article that told me the whole process. So I thought, “Wayne your readers need this!” And now here it is.

The Solution

Earlier this week I wrote an article about how to link scripts and stylesheets correctly in WordPress. If you feel like you don’t know how to do this go ahead and read that article because we are going to use that knowledge here in this article.

Linking correctly in WordPress

Link Scripts and Stylesheets Correctly in WordPress

If you are a web developer and build websites using HTML and CSS, you already know how to attach css and js files in the head of your webpage. Well there is a completely different way to link scripts and stylesheets correctly in WordPress. This is what we are going to solve today!

The Solution

Hopefully you already have a good grasp on the page template hierarchy in WordPress, but if you don’t you can learn about it in the WordPress Codex. We need to access the functions.php file because we need to add some code into it to “enqueue” or call the styles and scripts. We will not be adding the below code into the head of our webpage: